SE AUS WIND POWER

satellite

Photo above: Cathedral Rocks Wind Farm, South Australia

1. INTRODUCTION

This page (under construction) gives a summary of wind power in South East Australia (SA, VIC and TAS), and provides an index of posts on that subject.

Peak demand for electricity in South Australia and Victoria occurs in late afternoon/early evening of summer heatwaves, so there is great interest in the amount of wind power generated in such weather conditions. Wind power and demand data are available only for a limited number of years, but in its absence weather data can be used to assess the wind speeds (and hence estimate the wind power today) of past heatwaves.

Posts on Capacity Factors during heatwaves

2. 21st CENTURY HEATWAVES in SA

Synoptic charts are available from the BoM for Australia back to the summer of 1999/2000, so I show below the summer daily maximum temperatures at Adelaide Kent Town (BoM station id 23090) back to that summer:

adel_tmax_2013

adel_tmax_2008

adel_tmax_2004

adel_tmax_2000

3. WIND POWER IN RECENT HEATWAVES

Recent heatwaves (since 2011) are important for analysis purposes because there is wind power and demand data available. The many wind farms in SE Australia are separated here into 6 regional groups, marked 1 to 6 on the following map:

wind_farms

  • Group 1: Bald Hills, Toora, Wonthaggi, Musselroe, Woolnorth
  • Group 2: Mount Mercer, Hepburn, Waubra, Ararat, Coonooer, Challicum
  • Group 3: Macarthur, Portland, Codrington, Yambuk, Oaklands, Mortons Lane
  • Group 4: Lake Bonny, Canunda, Starfish Hill
  • Group 5: Cathedral Rocks, Mount Millar
  • Group 6: Clements Gap, Waterloo, Hallett, Hornsdale, Snowtown, Wattle Point, Bluff Range, North Brown Hill

The following sub-sections show the total wind power for each group of wind farms, at 5-minute resolution, for all days for which the maximum temperature at Adelaide Kent Town exceeded 35C. Group 1 is at the top, group 6 at the bottom.

3.1 2016 March 5-8 (38.7, 38.0, 30.7, 37.1C):

tas_vic_mar2016_5th

sa_mar2016_5th

3.2 2016 February 21-23 (37.0, 39.5, 37.0C)

tas_vic_feb2016_21st

sa_feb2016_21st

3.3 2016 January 17-21 (36.6, 38.5, 35.9, 34.3, 36.7C):

tas_vic_jan2016_17th

sa_jan2016_17th

3.4 2016 January 9-13 (34.8, 37.6, 37.9, 39.8, 35.1C):

tas_vic_jan2016_9th

sa_jan2016_9th3.5 2015 December 30 – 2016 January 1 2016 (38.1, 40.6, 35.0C)

tas_vic_dec2015_30th

sa_dec2015_30th

3.6 2015 December 14-19 (37.2, 36.2, 41.1, 42.9, 40.8, 43.2C)

tas_vic_dec2015_14th

sa_dec2015_14th

3.7 2015 December 4-7 (34.8, 40.2, 41.5, 38.5C)

tas_vic_dec2015_4th

sa_dec2015_4th

3.8 2015 November 17-19 (35.7, 40.1, 37.4C):

tas_vic_nov2015_17th

sa_nov2015_17th

4. EARLIER HEATWAVES

4.1 January 13-17th 2014 (42.1, 45.1, 43.7, 44.2, 42.7C)

idx0102-201401130600

idx0102-201401140600

idx0102-201401150600

idx0102-201401160600

idx0102-201401170600

The following figure, produced by the AEMO, indicates that there was very low wind power at the times of peak demand on 13th and 15th January 2014:

AEMO_2014_Jan_heatwave

Note that SA wind power was consistently higher at night than during the day.

4.2 29th-31st January 2011 (37.7, 42.5, 42.9C)

idx0102-201101290600

idx0102-201101300600

idx0102-201101310600

The low wind speeds suggested by the synoptic charts above are confirmed by the wind power data reported by the AEMO in the following figure:

AEMO_2011_heatwave_nowind_CEO12_106_2

Note again that SA wind power was higher at night than during the day.

More to follow …

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